Making Aaron

See also

Measurements

Documentation for the measurements required to draft Aaron

Aaron measurements

Options

Documentation for all the options that come with aaron

Aaron options

Save time, trees, and effort: go paperless

If you want to avoid printing your pattern, make sure to use the paperless theme so you can avoid the entire printing/sticky tape business altogether.

Read more about paperless patterns

Before you start

Your end goal
Your end goal

What you need

To make Aaron, you will need the following:

Fabric options

An A-shirt is essentially underwear. And in that capacity, you want something that is comfortable, feels nice on your skin and breaths.

Cotton with a hint of something stretchy, maybe rayon, or a fine knit. I suggest you go to the fabric store and feel around a bit.

While stretch is not required, it does make sense for underwear. That being said, you can make this in a non-stretch, just make sure pick loose or casual fit.

Cutting

  • Main fabric
    • Cut 1 back on the fold
    • Cut 1 front on the fold
    • Cut 3 strips for neck opening and armhole binding
Caveats
  • For both front and back
    • No seam allowance on the armholes
    • No seam allowance on the neck opening
    • Extra hem allowance at the hem.

Aaron is a very simply pattern, and consists of two main parts plus some strips for the neck and armhole binding.

Below is a typical draft layout:

A typical Aaron draft
A typical Aaron draft
Check the printing scale

If you printed your pattern, use the scale box to double check that your draft was printed at the correct scale.

Notation legend

The notation legend explains all the different markings and lines on your draft.

Construction

Step 1: Close seams

Close the side and shoulder seams
Close the side and shoulder seams

Put front and back on top of each other with good sides together. Serge the side seams, and the short seams at the shoulder straps.

A serger/overlock is nice, but optional

As with all knitwear and stretch fabrics, a serger/overlock will make your life easier.

If you do not have one of those, don’t despair. You don’t really need it. Because these side seams and shoulder seams won’t get stretched out, you can just sew them with a regular straight stitch.

Step 2: Finish hem

Finish the hem
Finish the hem

Fold the hem upwards, and sew it down. If you have a coverlock, use it. If not, use a twin needle or zig-zag stitch to keep the seam stretchable.

Fold only once, to avoid bulk

Knitwear doesn’t ravel, so you can simply fold this over once and sew it down, then neatly trim back the fabric.

A coverlock is nice, but optional

As with all knitwear and stretch fabrics, a coverlock will make your life easier.

If you do not have one of those, don’t despair. You just need to make sure that your hem can stretch. But a twin-needle or zig-zag stitch will do that for you too.

Step 3: Sew knit binding to the front

About knit binding

If you are new to knit binding, you might read this page on the subject.

Repeat steps 3 and 4 for both armholes and the neck opening

The procedure outline below applies to both of the armholes as well as the neck opening. In other words, you’ll have to do this three times.

Start with the simplest opening

I would advice you to start with whatever opening has the most uniform curvature. By default, those are the arm holes, but if you changed the pattern options (think racerback) that might not be the case.

Either way, the less sharp bends you have, the easier it will be. So start with that to warm up before you do the trickier bends.

We are going to finish the arm and neck hole with knit binding (note: not a knit band. There’s a difference, and it’s explained here).

This is the only part of making this A-shirt that requires a bit of practice. Don’t worry, all you need to do is make a couple of these and you’ll be a pro in no time.

Pick your spot

Applying knit binding
Applying knit binding

The first thing we need to do is decide where we are going to start/stop our binding. Here’s what I suggest:

  • For the armholes: at the side seam. This will hide our seam under the arm
  • For the neck opening: the center back of the neck. You might want to make this with a pin

Place (the start of) your binding

Place (the start of) your binding
Place (the start of) your binding

Put your A-shirt down with the good side up, and place your binding strip on top of it with the good side down (as in, good sides together).

Aling the long edge of your strip with the edge of your fabric so the strip lies on top of the fabric (not in the opening). Place the corner on your starting point.

Now shift your binding strip 1cm beyond your starting point. This little extra will guarantee we can join the two ends later.

The easy way to keep this 1.5cm distance is by using a seam gauge. Or do what I do, place a piece of making tape on your sewing machine and mark a line on it 1.5cm from your needle. Then all you need to do is keep the edge of your fabric aligned with that line.

Make sure you know where to sew

Make sure you know where to sew
Make sure you know where to sew

We are going to sew 1.5cm from the edge. So be careful because this is not the standard seam allowance.

Also, we are not starting at our start point, but we skip the first 3cm. We’ll need this wiggle room later to join the ends of our binding.

Sew binding in place

Sew binding in place
Sew binding in place

Sew your binding in place while gently stretching the binding, but not the fabric. Make sure not to sew the last 3cm but leave them, just as you did at the start.

You might need to practice a bit to get the hang of it.

Make sure to stretch your binding more when you’re taking a sharper bend. Read my notes on knit binding for more info.

Mark binding ends

Joining the binding ends
Joining the binding ends

With about 6cm left to go before we complete our circle, it’s time to sew the ends of the binding together.

Mark binding ends
Mark binding ends

Take one of the edges, and stretch it along the 3cm seperating it from the start point as you would while sewing.

Mark the where the binding reached the start point. Do the same for the other end.

Sew binding ends together

Join the ends of the binding
Join the ends of the binding

Fold you A-shirt in whatever way makes it more easy for your to place both binding ends with good sides together, aligning the marks. Sew them together on the mark.

6 cm is not much, but should be enough to get both edges comfortably under your sewing machine to sew them togther.

Finish last 6cm of binding

Sew binding ends together
Sew binding ends together

Now that your binding ends are joined together, it’s time to finish the last 6cm of binding. Sew it down, staying 1.5cm from the edge as you did before.

Step 4: Fold knit binding to the back and sew down

Fold your binding over the fabric edge to the back

Fold knit binding to the back
Fold knit binding to the back

Fold your binding fabric around the fabric of your A-shirt to the back. This is how we’ll sew it down.

While the fabric is folded double at the front (hiding the fabric edge in the process) there’s no need for that at the back. We will merely trim back the edge later, given that knit doesn’t ravel. If we were to fold back the fabric at the back too, it would only add bulk.

Sew your binding down

Sew knit binding down
Sew knit binding down

From the right side of your fabric, sew along the inner edge of your binding (furthest from the edge), making sure to catch the binding at the back in the process.

If you have a coverlock machine, that would be perfect for this seam

You’ll have to, once again, stretch your binding a bit while doing this. But this time, there’s an extra caveat to look out for.

Beware of the uneven feed

As your feed your binding through your sewing machine, the feed dogs will pull the bottom layer (back of your binding) forward.

In a perfect world, all layers will follow smoothly. But more often than not, the top layer (front of your binding) tends to lag behind a bit. This causes your binding to not neatly fold around the edge of the fabric, but make ugly wrinkles.

So watch out for this, and if you see it happening, stretch the under layer a bit extra to compensate.

Step 5: Trim back knit binding on the inside

Trim back knit binding on the inside
Trim back knit binding on the inside

On the inside of you A-shirt, trim back the knit binding against your seam to finish up.

Be careful not to cut a hole in your A-shirt. Seriously, this happened to me on more than one occasion.

Congratulations, you did it!

You've completed all the steps to make this, well done you!

We'd love to see what you came up with. Make sure to send us some pictures, or even better: share them on social media.

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